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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Rand Paul
Senator (R-Kentucky), Member of Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs
FOXNEWSW 06/09/2013
“…we are talking about trolling through billions of phone records. We are not talking about going after a terrorist. I’m all for that. Get a warrant go, after a terrorist or a murderer or a rapist, but don't troll through a billion phone records every day. That is unconstitutional. It invades our privacy. I am going to see if I can challenge this at the supreme court level.”
Rand Paul
Senator (R-Kentucky), Member of Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs
CNNW 06/18/2013
Rand Paul speaking about Dir. Of Intelligence, James Clapper "(I don't know how you consider him credible.) When you come before the senate and lie -- he was warned of it. They called the director of national intelligence and said, we're going to ask you this question. So even though he was told in advance he would get the question, he still lied in a public hearing. I think there needs to be an open debate and Americans need to decide are you willing to give up the da a on all of your phone calls every day all the time because of your fear for terrorism or( do you think like I do that you can catch terrorists and have the bill of rights at the same time? I frankly think you can have both.)
Rand Paul
Senator (R-Kentucky), Member of Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs
CNNW 06/18/2013
but to my knowledge none of the people captured or prevented were traced from random numbers. They were traced from a suspect. So you have a suspect who makes phone calls. I'm all for looking at a suspect's phone calls when the judges warrant and the next person, you look at their phone calls. My understanding is they like looking at all Americans' phone records because they think it's easier and faster. That's what I heard from them. Easier and faster, but not that they couldn't have done this with a regular traditional judicial warrant.
Rand Paul
Senator (R-Kentucky), Member of Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs
CNNW 12/18/2013
Paul: I’m very offend that the intelligence director lied to congress which is perjury and punishable by time in jail, and the President has glibly gone on his way, has not asked for his resignation, has not said that he will try him in court for lying to congress. I find that really -- that Clapper is lying to Congress is probably more injurious to our intelligent capabilities than anything Snowden did because Clapper has damaged the credibility of the entire intelligence apparatus and I'm not sure what to believe anymore when they come to Congress.
Rand Paul
Senator (R-Kentucky), Member of Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs
CNNW 12/18/2013
Paul: the government is breaking the law, and that is the argument here, and now it's been upheld by a federal court saying that the government is breaking the law, and i do think what you're government is doing is unconstitutional, and i really think that in order to restore confidence in our intelligence community, i think James Clapper should resign.
Rand Paul
Senator (R-Kentucky), Member of Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs
CNNW 12/18/2013
Blitzer: So just to be precise, if it were up to you, you'd have the justice department file charges, criminal charges, against James Clapper? Paul: Otherwise you're just encouraging people to lie to us, and then we have no confidence now -- if the intelligence community says we're not spying on Americans and they are, and then they say we're not collecting any data, it's hard to have confidence in them. Now they are saying we capture terrorists with this data. Are we to believe them or not to believe them? If they are going to come to us and lie it really damages the credibility, and it's damaged our credibility worldwide, but really with the American people because we don't know what to believe. I don't know how you can have someone in charge over intelligence who has known to lie in a public forum to Congress, to lie without repercussions I really blame the President for not taking a better handle on things.
Rand Paul
Senator (R-Kentucky), Member of Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs
CNNW 12/19/2013
Rand Paul: Clapper's lying to congress is probably more injurious to our intelligence capabilities than anything Snowden did because Clapper has damaged the credibility of the entire intelligence apparatus and I'm not sure what to believe anymore when they come to Congress.
Rand Paul
Senator (R-Kentucky), Member of Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs
KGO 01/05/2014
Paul: in the end, history is going to judge that he revealed great abuses of our government and great abuses of our intelligence community. And that James Clapper, in lying to Congress, really, seriously destroyed the credibility of our intelligence agencies. And even though I actually give them the benefit of the doubt. I don't think James Clapper is a bad person. I think he's a patriotic person who wants to stop terrorism. So I don't think he was a bad person. But by lying to Congress he’s made us doubt and believe that maybe the government could be listening to our phone calls, even though they tell us they're not.
Rand Paul
Senator (R-Kentucky), Member of Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs
KNTV 01/27/2014
Paul: …he’s a traitor, this and that. I don't assign bad motives to Snowden. I think his motives were good. And I'm not sure he did the right thing or did it in the right way. But I also don't assign bad motives to James Clapper but James Clapper did break the law and he has exposed himself to five years in prison for perjury. So you can't have it both ways. You can't say we're going to throw the book at Snowden and we’re going to ignore perjury to congress by James Clapper. I think they both, if you want to apply the law, the law has to be applied equally.
Elisebeth Collins
Privacy Oversight Board
FOXNEWSW 07/06/2014
Emanuel: The panel also issued detailed proposals to tighten up. Collins: The recommendations are designed to prevent the section 702 program from transforming over time from a foreign intelligence program to a means of effectively surveilling U.S. persons. Emanuel: The surveillance became public following leaks from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. On Capitol Hill, some liberals and conservatives have joined forces in recent months to speak out about privacy and civil liberties. Wyden: A particularly vigorous oversight over the intelligence field needs to get more attention. It's not something you can minimize. Liberty and security are not mutually exclusive. Paul: Some say it's only records held anonymously, only rarely accessed. What's your beef? What they rarely mention is that they don't believe any of your records have any fourth amendment protection.
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